Fridays 5 03/04/2022

Standard

This week I ask the authors: What is the hardest part of writing?

Clicking on the authors name will take you to their website or amazon author page.

SJ Krandall

A: The hardest part of writing for me is editing. Editing is a must and I have editors that are very helpful. It is the time when I get to add all the details which is the fun part. However, it is a long repetitive process and it takes time involving many rewrites. 

Bio: S. J. Krandall is a horror author whose recent work was published in summer of 2020.  She was born in Florida but raised in New Jersey where she still resides with my husband, their two sons and two dogs. For more than twenty years she has worked with children with varying abilities as both a teacher and an aide. Now, a stay a home mom, she cares for her family and takes time to enjoy other interests. Her work in progress includes her second book to her series and a variety of short stories. 

Thad White

A: Depends if you mean writing specifically, or include peripheral stuff that’s essential but not actually writing. For the latter, it’s promotion/marketing. There’s a stereotype of Englishmen being a bit backward about coming forward, and I’m even more introverted than that. It just feels awkward trying to promote myself and my work.

For writing specifically I don’t get writer’s block often but when I do it often takes days or even weeks to properly overcome. Better background work (planning the plot and building the world) have helped to reduce the number of times this happens.

Bio: Thaddeus White is a pen name for someone else. He’s a Yorkshireman, and as well as being an avid fantasy reader/writer enjoys classical history. In addition to his fantastical writings, he offers tips on F1, with varying degrees of success.

David A Simpson

David A Sinpson Author Photo

A: Finding the time and still having the energy to pour into it.

Bio: David A. Simpson is an Amazon bestselling author of the Zombie Road and Feral Children series. He loves to travel and has a long list of places to visit on his bucket list. He likes weird things and will drive a hundred miles out of his way to see a weird sculpture made from junkyard parts or a Bonnie and Clyde museum.

J.A. Russell

A: The hardest part of writing for me is getting started. Social networks are my drug of choice, and make for many a day wasted – to a point. Other than that, knowing when to stop going over a piece is hard for me.

Bio: J A Russell is a horror writer, and publisher, living in Edmonton, AB, Canada. Her stories have appeared in anthologies by Brazen Snake Books, Static Movement, Wicked East Press, and Hidden Thoughts Press, just to name a few.
Her taste for the macabre has provided her imagination with a feast that fuels her writing and creativity. If you like horror, the bizarre, or you just don’t like to sleep at night, give her books and short stories a try.

Craig Saunder

A: Getting published! Ha. I don’t find writing difficult (usually, though I get blocked from time to time, like most of us!). I aim for 500 words a day, and try to hit that every day, but getting published has proven to be by far the hardest thing. It’s a challenge, though, so it never gets tiring, trying…

Bio: Craig Saunders lives in Norfolk, England, with his wife and three children, who he pretends to listen to while making up stories in his head. He has published more than two dozen short stories, and is the author of the novels Rain, Spiggot, and The Love of the Dead. Craig publishes science fiction with Severed Press. He also publishes novels independently under the Dark Fable Books/Fable Books labels and considers himself a hybrid author.

Craig writes in a shed and blogs about writing and his ongoing battle with schizophrenic affective disorder and he is a fierce advocate for mental health rights.


This Way to Heaven

Coming of age during the zombie apocalypse

Click on the image above to start reading today.

Kindle Vella, stories told one episode at a time.

How far would you go to survive? On the eve of the zombie apocalypse four boys witness the dawn of a new age. Trapped in the apartment building where they live, they will be forced to put aside their innocent ways and embrace the darkness that lives within all of us, if they hope to survive.

It’s not long before they learn the walking dead are the least of their worries as rivalries threaten to divide them, and an evil presence in the basement seeks to enslave them.

Fridays 5 02/25/2022

Standard

This week I ask: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Clicking on the authors name will take you to their website or amazon author page. Check them out, show some love, maybe you’ll find a new author to follow.

Dave Wimset

Dave Wimset author photo

A: I was taking a novel writing course many decades ago with a bestselling author and thought the manuscript I handed in the first week was fantastic. The instructor detailed numerous deficits, all of them true. I wandered out of the classroom feeling terrible and reached an intersection. There was a trash can next to me. I said to myself, out loud, “All tight. This is where you choose. Either throw this manuscript in the trash and never write again or accept that you need to stop thinking of your writing as your baby or your blood on the page and learn to take criticism and use it to improve. That is the point at which I became a writer.

Bio: David A. Wimsett’s stories contain female and male characters who examine themselves and their place in the world. He is the author of the women’s fiction novel Beyond the Shallow Bank and The Carandir Saga, an epic fantasy series consisting of Dragons Unremembered, Half Awakened Dreams, and Covenant with the Dragons.

He is a member of the Writers’ Union of Canada, the Canadian Freelance Guild and the Writers’ Federation of Nova Scotia where he sits on the Writer’s Council. He lives in Nova Scotia, Canada near the sea.

Alice Sobo

A: I think it was Rita Mae brown that said to celebrate your rejections, it means you’re off the porch and running with the big dogs. When I started submitting to magazines and contests, I considered myself officially a writer. Before that I think it was just a hobby. The commitment to finish a story, polish it and research a market for it made me feel like it was for real.

Bio: Alice Sabo is the author of character driven stories in post-apocalyptic, space opera, fantasy, and mystery series. Across genres, her characters deal with trying to make positive choices in difficult and often dangerous situations. Whether seeking lost cultures in an unforgiving galaxy or finding a murderer on the streets of LA, her books have strong world building, multi-layered characters, and a satisfying culmination.

Pete Mesling

A: Garrison Keillor once remarked that an artist is someone who gets up in the morning and does art. By that definition I remain something of a failure. I get up most days and go to work like a schmuck. The writing I do when I can, and that means lunch breaks evenings, and weekends, folks. But publishing has done a lot to make me feel like a proper writer, especially having some books out there with only my name on them. Writing every day is important for me, too. I’m not masochistic about word counts, and I’m happy to let blog posts qualify on a slow day, but having my head in the game more or less daily keeps me going—and feeling like a writer.

Bio: Pete Mesling has published poetry and fiction widely, including two highly regarded horror collections, a book of poetry, and a novel of intrigue and suspense. Other publishing highlights include All-American Horror of the 21st Century, the First Decade: 2000 – 2010 (Independent Legions Publishing); Survive the Night: Three at Dusk, Two at Dawn (forthcoming from Dark Regions Press); Shallow Waters, Vol. 3 (Crystal Lake Publishing); and two of the Poetry Showcase anthologies put out by the Horror Writers Association. Mesling is the official Clive Barker proofreader for Gauntlet Press.

A.M. Harte

A: I’ve been writing for far longer than I can remember, but I honestly never seriously thought of myself as a writer until recently.

I started out as a voracious reader. I lived books, breathed books. Writing was something I did on the side, for myself, a clumsy attempt to emulate the books that gave me so much pleasure. A way to get those characters rattling around in my head out onto a page, to live out my dreams.

Throughout my late teenage years, things changed. From emailing chapters to my sister, I progressed to posting work online. I gained readers — readers who came back every week for more. Their encouragement and support made something click in my head. It confirmed to me that I wanted to be a writer, wanted to keep writing and sharing stories.

That’s when I started thinking of myself as a writer.

See, despite the romantic ideal of the lonely author locked up in a cave somewhere, inscribing words on a stone tablet fuelled only by alcohol and caffeine, I ultimately believe that writing is for readers. If you don’t want someone to read that story one day, why write it down? I think that’s why I only recently began to think of myself as a writer, because previously I wasn’t really writing to share.

 Are you a writer if you don’t have readers? If a tree falls in an empty forest, does it make a sound?

Bio: A.M. Harte writes twisted speculative fiction, such as the zombie love anthology Hungry For You. She is excellent at missing deadlines, has long forgotten what ‘free time’ means, and is utterly addicted to chocolate.

Wednesday Lee Friday

A: From age 5-11, then not again until my 30’s. There was this whole, wide swath of time when I didn’t think I could ever “really” be a writer. I thought I needed someone else to tell me I was a writer, instead of just getting the hell out there and writing. Glad I finally figured it out—but wish I’d started 20 years earlier.

Bio: Wednesday lives in Ann Arbor, Michigan with her husband and two crafty cats. She is a member of the Horror Writer’s Association, and also enjoys Shostakovich, Dexter, loom knitting, The Simpsons, crafty things, quality horror of all kinds, and kettle cooked potato chips. She covers TV and movies for 411Mania, sexy stuff at Kinkly.com, and has done a ton of ghostwriting…though not about ghosts.


This Way to Heaven

Click on the image above to start reading today.

26 Episodes now available.

Kindle Vella: Stories told one episode at a time.

Synopsis: As if their lives weren’t tough enough, a zombie apocalypse has changed the world for four boys living on the hard edge of life. Trapped in the apartment building where they live, they will be forced to embrace the darkness that lives within, if they hope to survive. It isn’t long before they learn the walking dead are the least of their worries as rivalries boil to the surface within their small group.

If that wasn’t bad enough they find out the basement is haunted by the ghosts of the past and a creature that needs to feed on their fear. Trapped between the terrors outside, and the horror within, their only hope lies behind a solitary door in the basement that appears to offer refuge.

But what will it cost to escape.?

About the author: Richard is the author of eight novels, three novellas, and a collection of short stories. His most recent novel is a paranormal ghost story titled Cursed. He is a member of the Horror Writers Association, and the Maryland Writers Association.

Fridays 5 02/18/2022

Standard

This week I ask the authors: How did you feel upon publication of your first completed project?

Clicking on the authors name will take you to their website or amazon author page.

Thomas F Monteleone

A: When I saw my name on the cover of the March 1973 issue of Amazing Science Fiction magazine, I realized I had accomplished something that 99% of the population would never do. And most likely would never think to do.

Bio: Thomas F Monteleone has been a professional writer since 1972, and 4-time winner of the Bram Stoker Award. He has published more than 100 short stories in numerous magazines and anthologies. His stories have been nominated for many awards and have appeared in many best-of-the-year compilations.

Graham Masterton

A: I was a newspaper reporter before my first book was published and so loads of articles and features had been published with my byline every week for years, so not particularly thrilled.

Bio: Graham Masterton has published more than thirty-five horror novels and three short story collections: his debut novel, The Manitou, was an instant bestseller. He is an Edgar Award and Bram Stoker Award-winner and a World Fantasy Award-nominee. Born in Edinburgh in 1946, he lives in Surrey in England where he is currently working on his next horror novel. 

Phil Yang

A: Not published—yet! I will self publish my fiction series when it is done though. No one can stop me! Only myself, ha.\

Bio: Phil currently lives in Florida and is a Stetson University graduate. In his free time, he likes to watch YouTube, surf the internet, play video games, eat new food, travel and take pictures.

Diane Johnson

A: I was nervous with my first publication. I’m sure everyone is. I’m not good at self promotion, and it was a self published book, so there’s a little bit of a stigma with that. Imposter syndrome is real! But I was also excited to get that first book out there, to have something finished and in my hands.

Bio: Diane graduated from Binghamton University with a B.A. in Film Theory. She first embarked on her storytelling journey as a screenwriter, and she apologizes. She has a husband. And kids. And if this writing thing takes off, maybe she’ll invest in a dog. A rescue, of course!

Justin Boote

A: Coinciding with my answer to question no.1, I would say it made me feel that maybe I was capable of writing something that not only people enjoy reading but that publishers are prepared to pay for. That made a big difference as opposed to just hearing friends tell you they love your work. It was a confirmation of sorts.

Bio: Justin Boote is an Englishman living in Barcelona for over 25 years and has been writing horror stories for 5 years. In this time, he has had around 40 short stories published in a variety of anthologies and has published 4 short stories on Amazon plus 2 story collections and now dedicates his time to writing novel series. In the summer he hopes to release the first of his series on Amazon-The Ghosts of Northgate.


This Way to Heaven

As if their lives weren’t tough enough, a zombie apocalypse has changed the world for four boys living on the hard edge of life. Trapped in the apartment building where they live, they will be forced to embrace the darkness that lives within, if they hope to survive. It isn’t long before they learn the walking dead are the least of their worries as rivalries boil to the surface within their small group.

If that wasn’t bad enough they find out the basement is haunted by the ghosts of the past and a creature that needs to feed on their fear. Trapped between the terrors outside, and the horror within, their only hope lies behind a solitary door in the basement that appears to offer refuge.

But what will it cost to escape.?

A Kindle Vella feature, stories told one episode at a time. Click on the image above to read the first three episodes for free.

Fridays 5 02/11/2022

Standard

This week I ask the authors: What is the hardest part of writing?

Clicking on the authors name will take you to their website or amazon author page.

Lisa Marie Wood

A: Interestingly enough, the writing itself (the crafting of the tale) isn’t hard to me. It can be challenging, sure, and it’s not without its ups and downs, but hard is not a label I would place on the process. The hard part about writing comes later – when I have to put together back cover copy or overviews or – shriek! – marketing copy. Condensing the behemoth of a novel down to 150 words… that’s where the difficulty lies! 

Bio: L. Marie Wood is an award-winning psychological horror author and screenwriter. She won the Golden Stake Award for her novel The Promise Keeper. Her screenplays have won Best Horror, Best Afrofuturism/Horror/Sci-Fi, and Best Short Screenplay awards at several film festivals.Wood’s short fiction has been published widely, most recently in Slay: Stories of the Vampire Noire and Bram Stoker Award Finalist anthology, Sycorax’s Daughters.

Marc Todd

A: Time -finding the right time. Some days the ideas and the writing are synched perfectly. But there are days when the ideas are there but the writing is laborious, or vice-versa, I’m in the mood to write but have no inspiration. With working full-time and a busy social and family life, finding the right time where that synchronicity of ideas and ability merge is sporadic. Even if I were to set aside time, I don’t think it would work. Everything needs to come together perfectly for me to be truly productive. During the pandemic I was able to find more time – thus my book was completed.

Bio: Marc Todd is the writer and author of the thrilling horror novel ‘Chains’ (released in March 2021). He was raised and still resides in the Niagara Region, in southern Ontario Canada. Twice a year, in early spring and fall, he and a varied collection of friends enjoy portaging the northern Canadian woods of Algonquin, Killarney, Temagami, and the French River.

Lee Andrew Taylor

Lee Alan Taylor Author Photo

A: The editing for me. I could never END a story. I would edit, edit, edit, edit and every edit I would change things in the story. It was so frustrating not letting GO…But now I try to edit no more than three times.
Bio: Lee Taylor was born in Nuneaton, Warwickshire, UK, in 1969. He moved to Bedworth, Warwickshire at the age of 9. All his life he’s had a passion for creating things, whether it was new games to play with family and friends, drawing, or creating a story.

Mike Sherer

A: Promotion. I do not enjoy it. I’d rather be writing.
Bio: I live in the Greater Cincinnati area of southwest Ohio. My screenplay ‘Hamal 18’ was produced in Los Angeles and released direct to DVD. My paranormal suspense novel ‘A Cold Dish’ was published by James Ward Kirk Fiction. I have also published 4 novellas (including Under a Raging Moon) and 18 short stories.

Eric A Shelman

A: The hardest thing about being a writer is finding the right story. A story you’re not excited about will not inspire you to write.

Bio: Eric lives in southwest Florida with his wife, Linda. A fan of horror since he was young, he’s been writing since his teens. Growing up his room was filled with monster models, including The Wolfman, Dr. Phibes, Frankenstein’s Monster, and many others. His first novel, A Reason To Kill, was about a serial killer before he moved on to his true passion with The Witches of Laguna Beach. In 2009, after a 12 year hiatus, he wrote Dead Hunger. He currently has over 20 books to his credit, all but two of which are novels.

Fridays 5 02/04/2022

Standard

This week the authors answer the question: “If you could ask any author, living or dead, one question, who would you ask? And what would you ask them?”

Clicking on the authors name will take you to their amazon author page.

Craig Saunders

A: Joe Hill…when’s the next book coming out!? haha – I love Joe Hill, since reading Heart Shaped Box.

Bio: Craig Saunders lives in Norfolk, England, with his wife and three children, who he pretends to listen to while making up stories in his head. He has published more than two dozen short stories, and is the author of the novels Rain, Spiggot, and The Love of the Dead. Craig publishes science fiction with Severed Press. He also publishes novels independently under the Dark Fable Books/Fable Books labels and considers himself a hybrid author.

Scott Nicholson

A: I’d like to ask Mark Twain what he thinks of the 21st Century. I am sure he’d have a grand time making sport of Facebook!

Bio: Scott haphazardly trades words for magic beans and uses “haphazardly” as often as possible while decrying the overuse of adverbs. He had 105 rejections before his first story sale and over 400 before he sold a novel. He hasn’t learned much from his mistakes but thinks he’ll probably improve with practice. If nothing else, he’s become a better liar.

Rick Hatuala

A: I’d ask Shakespeare not where he got his ideas, but how he developed them … or I’d ask Hawthorne why he seemed to be depressed all the time.

Bio: Rick arrived on the horror scene in 1980 with many of his early novels published by Zebra books. He wrote and published over 90 novels and short stories from the early 1980s on. In 2011 the Horror Writers Association awarded Rick and Joe R. Lansdale the Bram Stoker Award for Lifetime Achievement. Sadly, on March 21 of 2013 we lost Rick to a heart attack. For me personally he was a writer who was always willing to help those of us starting out, and though I never met him personally I counted him among my friends.

William F Nolan

A: Bradbury said that he wanted to be buried on Mars in a Campbell soup can in the “Bradbury Abyss”. I’d ask Ray if he found his way home to Mars.

Bio: William writes stories in the science fiction, fantasy and horror genres. He is best known for coauthoring the novel Logan’s Run, with George Clayton Johnson. He co-wrote the screenplay for the 1976 horror film Burnt Offerings which starred Karen Black and Bette Davis.

Among his many awards, he was voted a Living Legend in Dark Fantasy by the International Horror Guild in 2002. During 2006, he was bestowed the honorary title of Author Emeritus by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, Inc. In 2010, he received the Lifetime Achievement award from the Horror Writers Association. The world lost William in July of 2021.

Peter Servido

A: Tolkien. I would want to know his inspiration for his world, creatures, and languages he created in Middle-Earth in his own works. And of course, I would also need to know if a hotdog is a sandwich?

Bio: Peter Servidio is a life-long learner with a passion for writing and is the author of the Earth Has Fallen series. After a childhood filled with reading books by Tolkien, Hubbard, Greenwood, Matheson, and Salvatore, Servidio has brought his imagination to life in his writings. His interests range from post-apocalyptic and dystopian worlds, to dabbling in crime novels and the metaphysical.

Having earned his doctorate from St. Thomas University, Servidio works as a College and Correspondence Coordinator for the Maine Department of Corrections as well as teachers part time at the University of Maine at Augusta. 


All Roads Lead to Terror

In a chaotic, post-apocalyptic world, an endless night is closing in, and only the strong will survive. In the midst of the turmoil, fourteen-year-old Meat, and his three closest friends, embark on a mission to rescue kidnapped children from the compound enslaving them.

Battling their way through treacherous terrain and immeasurable odds, the boys must learn to lean on each other if they hope to survive. Little do they know fate has far greater plans for them. For they represent the trinity, a symbol older than time itself, that keeps the darkness at bay.

They are three, bound by a fourth, destined to save mankind.

With time running out, and the cloak of eternal night descending, can the boys find a way to turn the tables on evil?

Or will they be the next to join the growing legion of the dead?

All Roads Lead to Terror

Click link above to order.

Fridays 5 01/28/2022

Standard

This week I ask: In addition to writing, what else are you passionate about?

Clicking on the authors name will take you to their website or Amazon author page.

Wednesday Lee Friday

A: Abnormal psychology, sociopolitical issues, carnivorous plants, mentoring young authors, all things horror.

Bio: Wednesday lives in Ann Arbor, Michigan with her husband and two crafty cats. She is a member of the Horror Writer’s Association, and also enjoys Shostakovich, Dexter, loom knitting, The Simpsons, crafty things, quality horror of all kinds, and kettle cooked potato chips. She covers TV and movies for 411Mania, sexy stuff at Kinkly.com, and has done a ton of ghostwriting…though not about ghosts.

SJ Krandall

A: In addition to writing I am most passionate about my family. Family life is important to me and I enjoy spending time with my sons sharing their interests as well. I have also worked for many years with children so I advocate for students in need when given the chance.  Photography and art is another passion of mine and I will often be found working on various projects.  I have many passions and enjoy life to its fullest. 

Bio: S. J. Krandall is a horror author whose recent work was published in summer of 2020.  She was born in Florida but raised in New Jersey where she still resides with my husband, their two sons and two dogs. For more than twenty years she has worked with children with varying abilities as both a teacher and an aide. Now, a stay a home mom, she cares for her family and takes time to enjoy other interests. Her work in progress includes her second book to her series and a variety of short stories. 

Thad White

A: I follow Formula 1 pretty closely, and love reading classical history and fantasy. As well as being fascinating in its own right history makes it easier to understand the modern world, the context of events and to build a more coherent and realistic fantasy world for writing.

Bio: Thaddeus White is a pen name for someone else. He’s a Yorkshireman, and as well as being an avid fantasy reader/writer enjoys classical history. In addition to his fantastical writings, he offers tips on F1, with varying degrees of success.

David A Simpson

David A Sinpson Author Photo

A: Cars. I have entirely too many and I want entirely too many more. I do a bit of racing and have held a couple of world records. I seem meet up with car community guys a lot more often than I do the writing community folks.

Bio: David A. Simpson is an Amazon bestselling author of the Zombie Road and Feral Children series. He loves to travel and has a long list of places to visit on his bucket list. He likes weird things and will drive a hundred miles out of his way to see a weird sculpture made from junkyard parts or a Bonnie and Clyde Museum.

J.A, Russell

A: I am passionate about reading and horses. I own a beautiful white appaloosa mare named Whisper. It is because of her I put together a charity anthology called Scarlet Whispers, that benefits a local equine rescue called Hilltop Haven. I even board my horse there – at least until I find my new country home.

Bio: J A Russell is a horror writer, and publisher, living in Edmonton, AB, Canada. Her stories have appeared in anthologies by Brazen Snake Books, Static Movement, Wicked East Press, and Hidden Thoughts Press, just to name a few.
Her taste for the macabre has provided her imagination with a feast that fuels her writing and creativity. If you like horror, the bizarre, or you just don’t like to sleep at night, give her books and short stories a try.

Cursed

Read for free with Kindle Unlimited.

Before Christine’s father left for Iraq he won her a stuffed bunny at a roadside carnival, promising her that as long as she kept the bunny by her side, he would always be with her. A year after his death she and her mother move across the country to the small Maryland town of Porter Mines.

On its surface Porter Mines looked like the perfect place to raise her daughter. But old secrets lie restless beneath that innocent facade, and Christine becomes the target of a legend that is proving to be more fact than fiction.

Will her father’s love be enough to protect her from the wrath of an old witch’s vengeance?

Or will she fall prey to the curse of Porter Mines?

Get your copy HERE.

Fridays 5 01/21/82022

Standard

This week I ask the authors: How did you feel upon publication of your first completed project?

Clicking on the authors name will take you to their website or amazon author page.

Justin Boote

A: Coinciding with my answer to question no.1, I would say it made me feel that maybe I was capable of writing something that not only people enjoy reading but that publishers are prepared to pay for. That made a big difference as opposed to just hearing friends tell you they love your work. It was a confirmation of sorts.

Bio: Justin Boote is an Englishman living in Barcelona for over 25 years and has been writing horror stories for 5 years. In this time, he has had around 40 short stories published in a variety of anthologies and has published 4 short stories on Amazon plus 2 story collections and now dedicates his time to writing novel series. In the summer he hopes to release the first of his series on Amazon-The Ghosts of Northgate.

Dave Wimset

Dave Wimset author photo

A: It was great to hold the book in my hand. The big emotional experience was when I finally finished the book and cried as the accomplishment sank in after years of work.

Bio: David A. Wimsett’s stories contain female and male characters who examine themselves and their place in the world. He is the author of the women’s fiction novel Beyond the Shallow Bank and The Carandir Saga, an epic fantasy series consisting of Dragons Unremembered, Half Awakened Dreams, and Covenant with the Dragons.

Alice Sobo

A: Ecstatic! I think it was an essay for a local free magazine – small beans in the writing world – but it was a thrill. I snatched a ton of copies and mailed them to all my friends.

Bio: Alice Sabo is the author of character driven stories in post-apocalyptic, space opera, fantasy, and mystery series. Across genres, her characters deal with trying to make positive choices in difficult and often dangerous situations. Whether seeking lost cultures in an unforgiving galaxy or finding a murderer on the streets of LA, her books have strong world building, multi-layered characters, and a satisfying culmination.

Pete Mesling

A: I’ll go back to my very first short story publication. It was actually my first time publishing a poem, too. Both appeared in the very last print issue of Black Petals Magazine. I was pleased to have my first publishing credit in a print publication, especially since I had submitted my work by snail mail. I felt like I got the classic writer’s experience out of the gate, and of course times were about to change drastically in the publishing world, so that was becoming an unlikely scenario by 2007.

Bio: Pete Mesling has published poetry and fiction widely, including two highly regarded horror collections, a book of poetry, and a novel of intrigue and suspense. Other publishing highlights include All-American Horror of the 21st Century, the First Decade: 2000 – 2010 (Independent Legions Publishing); Survive the Night: Three at Dusk, Two at Dawn (forthcoming from Dark Regions Press); Shallow Waters, Vol. 3 (Crystal Lake Publishing); and two of the Poetry Showcase anthologies put out by the Horror Writers Association. Mesling is the official Clive Barker proofreader for Gauntlet Press.

A.M. Harte

A: Exuberant and incredulous… and also really relieved. I feel that way with every release, to be honest.

Bio: A.M. Harte writes twisted speculative fiction, such as the zombie love anthology Hungry For You. She is excellent at missing deadlines, has long forgotten what ‘free time’ means, and is utterly addicted to chocolate.

What’s waiting behind the door in the basement?

How far would you go to survive?

On the eve of the zombie apocalypse four boys witness the dawn of a new age. Trapped in the apartment building where they live, they will be forced to put aside their innocent ways and embrace the darkness that lives within all of us, if they hope to survive.

It’s not long before they learn the walking dead are the least of their worries as rivalries threaten to divide them. In the basement they stumble upon a door unlike all the others.

What waits on the other side?

But more importantly, what will it cost to enter?

Read This Way to Heaven

A Kindle Vella serial story.

Stories told one episode at a time.

This Way to Heaven

Click the link above.

A new episode every week.

Fridays 5 01/14/2022

Standard

This week I ask: What is the hardest part of writing?

Clicking on the author’s name will take you to their website or amazon author page.

Eric A Shelman

A: The hardest thing about being a writer is finding the right story. A story you’re not excited about will not inspire you to write.

Bio: Eric lives in southwest Florida with his wife, Linda. A fan of horror since he was young, he’s been writing since his teens. Growing up his room was filled with monster models, including The Wolfman, Dr. Phibes, Frankenstein’s Monster, and many others. His first novel, A Reason To Kill, was about a serial killer before he moved on to his true passion with The Witches of Laguna Beach. In 2009, after a 12 year hiatus, he wrote Dead Hunger. He currently has over 20 books to his credit, all but two of which are novels.

Thomas F Monteleone

A: Forcing yourself to do it every day… even on the days when you have other stuff you must do or don’t feel the urging of the muse.

Bio: Thomas F Monteleone has been a professional writer since 1972, and 4-time winner of the Bram Stoker Award. He has published more than 100 short stories in numerous magazines and anthologies. His stories have been nominated for many awards and have appeared in many best-of-the-year compilations.

Graham Masterton

A: Continuously thinking about plot developments night and day. The world inside a writer’s head is just as real as the world outside it.

Bio: Graham Masterton has published more than thirty-five horror novels and three short story collections: his debut novel, The Manitou, was an instant bestseller. He is an Edgar Award and Bram Stoker Award-winner and a World Fantasy Award-nominee. Born in Edinburgh in 1946, he lives in Surrey in England where he is currently working on his next horror novel. 

Phil Yang

A: Avoiding procrastinating. Persevering through difficulties and doubts in general of being a writer.

Bio: Phil currently lives in Florida and is a Stetson University graduate. In his free time, he likes to watch YouTube, surf the internet, play video games, eat new food, travel and take pictures.

Diane Johnson

A: The hardest part of writing for me is interruptions. Especially during the pandemic while in close quarters with family. People see you staring at a screen, fingers paused, and they think you’re not doing anything. Then they speak, and the thought is gone. You can’t explain this without offending someone. Nicholson had it right in The Shining.

Bio: Diane graduated from Binghamton University with a B.A. in Film Theory. She first embarked on her storytelling journey as a screenwriter, and she apologizes. She has a husband. And kids. And if this writing thing takes off, maybe she’ll invest in a dog. A rescue, of course!

Have you read The Locked Room?

Greed can drive a person to do some pretty crazy things. It drives Peter to ignore the warning signs in his quest to find out what lies behind the locked door on the third floor of the Warrnick Mansion.

Why would someone nail a door shut? Unless it was to keep something in. Driven by dreams of riches beyond measure Peter does everything in his power to get into that locked room.

What’s waiting behind that silent facade?

Read The Locked Room to find out.

The Locked Room

A kindle Vella read, stories told one episode at a time. Read the first three episodes for free. Get 200 free tokens when you sign up.

Fridays 5 02/07/2022

Standard

This week I ask the authors : When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Click on the authors name for their website or amazon author page.

Dale E Lehman

A: I’ve been writing since childhood, but it wasn’t until high school that I thought of myself as a writer. Thereafter, it took years of study, practice, and my wife’s brutal red pen to develop my craft to the point of publishability. 

Bio: Dale E. Lehman is an award-winning writer, veteran software developer, amateur astronomer, and bonsai artist in training. He principally writes mysteries, science fiction, and humor. In addition to his novels, his writing has appeared in “Sky & Telescope” and on Medium.com. With his wife Kathleen he owns and operates the imprint Red Tales. They have five children, six grandchildren, and two feisty cats. At any given time, Dale is at work on several novels and short stories.

Lisa Marie Wood

A: Very early. I wrote my first work (I guess we’d call it a novelette now) when I was five years old. I knew I had put together a story that was capable of getting a reaction, so I labeled myself “author” right then and there.

Bio: L. Marie Wood is an award-winning psychological horror author and screenwriter. She won the Golden Stake Award for her novel The Promise Keeper. Her screenplays have won Best Horror, Best Afrofuturism/Horror/Sci-Fi, and Best Short Screenplay awards at several film festivals.Wood’s short fiction has been published widely, most recently in Slay: Stories of the Vampire Noire and Bram Stoker Award Finalist anthology, Sycorax’s Daughters.

Marc Todd

A: I’ve always enjoyed writing, ever since I started reading. The idea of being able to tell a story that other people would want to hear has always been captivating to me. I loved public speaking (still do) and performing in front of people (still do). Writing is part of that process. My favourite classes in school were English Literature and writing book reports was something I genuinely enjoyed. I remember writing song lyrics and singing in a band with friends. Music pulled me into writing my own poems, and studying poetry in school made me want to become better. I would say that I’ve always considered myself a lover of writing, but I had never considered myself a professional writer. And even now, with my first book published, I don’t think that my feelings have changed. It is super thrilling though, to have received positive reviews from strangers.

Bio: Marc Todd is the writer and author of the thrilling horror novel ‘Chains’ (released in March 2021). He was raised and still resides in the Niagara Region, in southern Ontario Canada. Twice a year, in early spring and fall, he and a varied collection of friends enjoy portaging the northern Canadian woods of Algonquin, Killarney, Temagami, and the French River.

Lee Alan Taylor Author Photo

Lee Andrew Taylor

A: That is a tough one. Consider because I got paid? or because I wrote something? I think most writers consider themselves a writer after writing something but for me, even though I’d been writing since a child, I never thought about considering myself a writer until I started getting positive feedback from readers. My mind changed from – I like writing to Wow! people like what I write –

Bio: Lee Taylor was born in Nuneaton, Warwickshire, UK, in 1969. He moved to Bedworth, Warwickshire at the age of 9. All his life he’s had a passion for creating things, whether it was new games to play with family and friends, drawing, or creating a story.

Mike Sherer

A: When I wrote my first rock lyrics in junior high.

Bio: I live in the Greater Cincinnati area of southwest Ohio. My screenplay ‘Hamal 18’ was produced in Los Angeles and released direct to DVD. My paranormal suspense novel ‘A Cold Dish’ was published by James Ward Kirk Fiction. I have also published 4 novellas (including Under a Raging Moon) and 18 short stories.

This Way to Heaven. How far would you go to survive?

Life has changed for Jimmy, Robert, Todd, and Wayne. Four young boys who live at the hard edge of life. Their world has been turned upside down by a zombie apocalypse. Follow along to see how they cope, but be warned, sometimes to survive we have to unleash the darkness that lives within all of us.

A kindle Vella read with a new episode every week. Read the first three episodes for free. Get 200 free tokens when you sign up.

This Way to Heaven

Fridays 5 09/10/2021

Standard

This week I ask the participants: What is the hardest part of writing?

Clicking on authors name will take you to their website or Amazon Author page.

Lee Andrew Tayor

Lee Alan Taylor Author Photo

A: The editing for me. I could never END a story. I would edit, edit, edit, edit and every edit I would change things in the story. It was so frustrating not letting GO…But now I try to edit no more than three times.

Bio: Lee was born in Nuneaton, Warwickshire, UK, in 1969. He moved to Bedworth, Warwickshire at the age of 9. All his life he’s had a passion for creating things, whether it was new games to play with family and friends, drawing, or creating a story.

Scott Nicholson

A:  Persistence and commitment. Writing is little more than putting one word after another, over and over.

Bio: Scott haphazardly trades words for magic beans and uses “haphazardly” as often as possible while decrying the overuse of adverbs. He had 105 rejections before his first story sale and over 400 before he sold a novel. He hasn’t learned much from his mistakes but thinks he’ll probably improve with practice. If nothing else, he’s become a better liar.

Craig Saunders

A:  Getting published! Ha. I don’t find writing difficult (usually, though I get blocked from time to time, like most of us!). I aim for 500 words a day, and try to hit that every day, but getting published has proven to be by far the hardest thing. It’s a challenge, though, so it never gets tiring, trying…

Bio: Craig Saunders lives in Norfolk, England, with his wife and three children, who he pretends to listen to while making up stories in his head. He has published more than two dozen short stories, and is the author of the novels Rain, Spiggot, and The Love of the Dead. Craig publishes science fiction with Severed Press. He also publishes novels independently under the Dark Fable Books/Fable Books labels and considers himself a hybrid author.

Alice Sobo

A:  Writing. Butt in chair. I have lots of ideas and conversations with my characters, but getting it all into the computer is hard work for me.

Bio: Alice Sabo is the author of character driven stories in post-apocalyptic, space opera, fantasy, and mystery series. Across genres, her characters deal with trying to make positive choices in difficult and often dangerous situations. Whether seeking lost cultures in an unforgiving galaxy or finding a murderer on the streets of LA, her books have strong world building, multi-layered characters, and a satisfying culmination.

Diane Johnson

A: The hardest part of writing for me is interruptions. Especially during the pandemic while in close quarters with family. People see you staring at a screen, fingers paused, and they think you’re not doing anything. Then they speak, and the thought is gone. You can’t explain this without offending someone. Nicholson had it right in The Shining.

Bio: Diane graduated from Binghamton University with a B.A. in Film Theory. She first embarked on her storytelling journey as a screenwriter, and she apologizes. She has a husband. And kids. And if this writing thing takes off, maybe she’ll invest in a dog. A rescue, of course!

ATTENTION

If you write horror, sci-fi, fantasy. Anything that falls under the speculative fiction umbrella and would like to participate. Follow this link: https://richardschiver.com/fridays-5/

Cursed

Before Christine’s father left for Iraq he won her a stuffed bunny at a roadside carnival, promising her that as long as she kept the bunny by her side, he would always be with her. A year after his death she and her mother move across the country to the small Maryland town of Porter Mines.

On its surface Porter Mines looked like the perfect place to raise her daughter. But old secrets lie restless beneath that innocent facade, and Christine soon becomes the target of an old legend that is more fact than fiction.

Will her father’s love be enough to protect her from the wrath of the old witch’s vengeance?

Or will she fall prey to the curse of Porter Mines?